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FLAGS AND SYMBOLS UNDER SPANISH OCCUPATION - 1

THE KING OF SPAIN FELIPE II
Portrait of Alonso Sanchez Coello

THE SEAL OF MANILA

SEALS OF "GOBIERNO DE FILIPINAS" AND SEALS OF MANILA

SEAL OF MANILA IN COLOR

SEAL OF ILOILO

PROVINCIAL ENSIGN 1845-1886, MANILA PROVINCIAL ENSIGN 1886-1898

PROVINCIAL ENSIGN OF ILO-ILO

In 1886, the Philippine Islands were divided into two provinces, Manila and Ilo-Ilo.
After the proclamation of the two provinces Manila adopted the ensign of 1845 and Ilo-Ilo the new white and blue ensign.

PAINTING OF FRANCISCO DE GOYA Y LUCIENTES
" JUNTA DE FILIPINAS" 1815
327 x 415 cm.
Museum:Museo Goya (Castres)

The larger canvas that Goya painted is dedicated to collect a session of the Board of the Royal Company of the Philippines headed by Ferdinand VII, the central figure of the composition at the confluence of all eyes. Beside him are Miguel de Lardizabal-minister of the Indies, and Jose Luis Munarriz, president of the Company. On both sides of the canvas chairs are occupied by various members of the institution while the fund is the desk chair with the "Wanted" as the most distinguished member. The light shines through the large window on the right, flooding much of the room to create an attractive game and atmospheric lighting reminiscent of the works of Velázquez. All the characters are individualized, expressive, creating a spectacular catalog of Spanish nobility and aristocracy.The Royal Philippine Company was incorporated in 1733 with the aim of establishing a line navigation of Cadiz to Manila. Due to low activity in 1785 increased the capital Cabarrus, involving the Charles III. Obtained the privilege of trading with Africa, India and the Philippines for 20 years, sending domestic and foreign products and importing many articles not only to Spain but to Europe and America. Mismanagement in the reign of Fernando VII caused the crisis, dissolved in 1834.




FLAG OF THE ROYAL PHILIPPINES COMPANY 1733 -1834 circa

The Company was projected in the light of the excellent results obtained by the Caracas company, and should have been formed in 1733 ; however, its considerable privileges provoked opposition, and formation never took place. However, in the early 1780s the idea was resurrected ; the object of the new company was to carry all types of Spanish goods to the American colonies, sell them for silver to buy oriental goods for sale in Spain. The company was duly formed in 1785, the Caracas and Barcelona companies being dissolved and incorporated into it. It was given the necessary rights of trade with the Philippines for 20 years, and the monopoly of sale in Spain of oriental goods ; the people of the Philippines were allowed to trade freely with India and China, to enable a wide range of goods to be available for the company's ships to buy. There was much opposition, notably from Holland, on the grounds of alleged violation of treaties, and by domestic interests who did not fancy oriental competition, particularly the cotton textile trade of Catalonia and the silk trade of Valencia.

The capital of the new company was 160 million reales, of which 60 million was subscribed by the King, and the Banco de San Carlos and the Cinco Gremios de Madrid were major shareholders.
The first expeditions made excellent profits and encouraged the company to expand, opening depots in all major Spanish ports in addition to the initial facilities in Madrid and Cadiz. However, in 1789, a decree was passed, allowing the general import into Spain of certain textiles covered by the company's monopoly. This hurt the company badly, since its warehouses were full of such goods it could not easily sell. Its need for liquid resources led to an issue of bonds, and the position was thereby much strengthened. With the reinforcement of its monopoly in 1793 the company flourished in the mid-1790s, when it was operating no fewer than 16 ships.
In 1796 began the process that was to lead to the downfall of the company. War broke out between Spain and England, and the following year the English captured one of its ships, laden with cargo. The company struggled on, with its fortunes fluctuating with war and peace, but by the end of the Peninsular War in 1815, it was in a sorry state. It managed to survive until 1834, when it was finally dissolved.


Spanish guidon of the First company of Cavalry - Provincial Regiment of the Philippines (1769 ).

REGIMENTAL FLAG OF PAMPANGA DRAGOONS, 1700 CIRCA

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